11 Benefits of Dance on Mental Health

Excerpt: Dancing has wide appeal for many older adults because of their positive memories and experiences at a younger age. Dancing bolsters physical and mental health by helping to prevent falls, improve posture and flexibility, lift mood and ease anxiety. It’s also a fun activity that sharpens the mind, increases aerobic power and strength, builds social bonds, and can reduce pain and stiffness.

Dancing has wide appeal for many older adults because some of their fondest memories and most positive life experiences involve dancing at different stages of life, from high school proms to their own and their children’s weddings.

By putting on your dancing shoes for a waltz, tango or foxtrot, you can embrace the fun feelings and memories, and also reap the many health benefits of dancing:

Prevent falls

Older adults who had mobility concerns, balance issues or early signs of memory loss reported less fear of falling* after participating in an adaptive ballroom dancing program, reported the McMaster Institute for Research in Aging. Dancing also reduces the prevalence of falling for healthy older adults,* according to a Journal of Aging and Physical Activity study.


Improve posture and flexibility

Older Australians who took 10 Ballet for Seniors classes increased their flexibility, improved posture and showed higher energy levels,* reported Massachusetts General Hospital.

Lift your mood

Dance movement therapy and dance improve mood, and can reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety,* according to a study in The Arts in Psychotherapy

Keep your mind sharp

Dance movement therapy and dance improve mood, and can reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety,* according to a study in The Arts in Psychotherapy.

Boost aerobic power and muscle strength

Dance movement therapy and dance improve mood, and can reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety,* according to a study in The Arts in Psychotherapy.

Make new friends

Dancing, or moving to music with others, encourages and increases social bonding with strangers,* according to an Oxford University study. Strong social connections improve long-term health as much as adequate sleep, a good diet and not smoking,* says Harvard Medical School.

Help your heart

Waltzing boosted heart health and improved breathing for people with mild to moderate heart failure as much as stationary cycling and walking on a treadmill, reported a Circulation: Heart Failure study. The Italian researchers noted dancing is fun and does more for the soul,* so patients are more likely to stick with it as an exercise program.

Reduce pain and stiffness

Older adults with knee and hip discomfort from arthritis were able to decrease their use of pain medication by 39% and move around more easily after participating in a 12-week, low-impact dance program, reported a Geriatric Nursing study.

No comments

Powered by Blogger.